The Impact of Savings and Credit Groups on Women in Africa: Consolidating Case-Studies from Ghana, Zambia and Tanzania.

The growing involvement and influence of women in philanthropy has gone largely unrecognized, despite the ripple effect that it has had on economies of households across the continent. Traditional modes of giving that are the becoming bedrock of many women’s livelihoods and by extension, their societies’. These practices are not well documented and their impact is under researched. For instance, the inner working as well as impact of women’s savings and credit groups (also referred to as ‘giving cycles’) is severely under represented in philanthropic statistics. The popularity and prevalence of these Groups implies that research on their research would be particularly important in exploring how wealth is distributed in African communities, and the impact this has on women. So, it’s important we ask!

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Publications

LEGAL ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL SOCIETY INCLUDING PHILANTHROPIC ORGANIZATIONS IN UGANDA

Uganda is one of several countries in Africa, which have adopted legal measures constraining legitimate activities of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), including philanthropy organisations, through a myriad of laws.1 The legal framework in Uganda has encouraged government meddling in the sector, above and beyond regulation, while simultaneously building obstacles in the operational environment of CSOs. This legal framework violates commitments undertaken by Uganda under international and regional human rights treaties, in particular those related to freedoms of association, and assembly, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR), both of which have been ratified by Uganda and provisions of which are also expressly provided for in the Constitution.

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